Ottawa Citizen
Tuesday 3 October 2000

Killaloe woman pleads not guilty in husband's killing

Jurors selected in sensational Pembroke murder trial

Peter Hum
The Ottawa Citizen


Gord Carter, The Ottawa Citizen / Cherrylle Dell, 45, arrives at court in Pembroke in time for the jury selection in her upcoming murder trial. Ms. Dell is charged with first-degree murder in connection with the December 1995 death of her estranged husband, Scott Dell. Mr. Dell, 44, died after drinking a mixture of wine and antifreeze.

PEMBROKE -- A Killaloe woman pleaded not guilty yesterday in the death of her estranged husband before jurors were selected for her upcoming murder trial.

From dozens of people screened for potential bias, 12 jurors were selected yesterday to hear evidence next month at the murder trial of Cherrylle Dell.

Eight men and four women are to hear evidence when the 45-year-old woman's trial begins Nov. 6.

Before jurors were selected yesterday, Ms. Dell resolutely pleaded not guilty to a charge of first-degree murder in connection with the December 1995 death of her husband, Scott Dell.

Mr. Dell, 44, died after drinking a mixture of wine and antifreeze.

Media attention in the Ottawa Valley after Mrs. Dell was charged prompted the court to take special measures in selecting a jury.

Eight hundred people were notified to report this week, 200 a day, to be in the jury pool. However, 12 jurors were found yesterday, and Justice James Chadwick said he would notify potential jurors slated to appear at the Pembroke courthouse tomorrow and Thursday that they would not be needed.

Three more people are to be selected today as alternate jurors.

The gathering of 200 people was so large yesterday that initial legal proceedings had to be held at the Fellowship Hall of Wesley United Church, beside the Pembroke courthouse.

Each of the 60 potential jurors yesterday was subjected to questioning to determine whether pre-trial publicity and talk in the community had tainted them.

A few responded that they would have been unable to try the case without bias, and they were excused.

Other potential jurors were rejected by the lawyers involved in the case.

When the trial begins, it is expected to last as long as seven weeks. This month, Judge Chadwick is to hold hearings to determine the admissibility of certain evidence.

More than 60 people are listed as prospective witnesses.

Copyright 2000 Ottawa Citizen